Tag Archives: winter

How to survive the cold in the Baltics

Two annoying cliches I keep hearing in my travels are: “Are you saying you’re cold? But you must be used to it!” and “Lithuania? Is it cold over there?” Northern location plus climate change mean that it may or may not be cold in the Baltics. It depends on winds. I never ask Americans if they have tornadoes all the time. But if you happen to be traveling in the Baltics when it’s cold, it’s always good to be prepared. The ever-changing weather in late fall and winter comes with many dangers.

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Remembering a trip to the Dead Sea a year ago (updated!)

What to do on Valentine′s day not to make it become cheesy? I found a great solution this year – I went to a local feminist gathering. But it′s also a good chance to remember that last year at this time I was somewhere far away, exploring one of the most special places on Earth – the Dead Sea. Update: in 2015, I went there again and took better photos.

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Winter now and then

It is an unusually warm winter in Lithuania, and of course when holidays come people are discussing the absence of snow.

In the meantime I’m slowly arranging some old photos, so I guess it’s a good excuse to share one from Sweden. In 2005 I went to Haparanda in the North of Sweden, where a Swedish family adopted me and my friend for Christmas. There was certainly no lack of snow back then.

Towards the Polar Circle

Towards the Arctic Circle [click on the image to enlarge it]

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Frozen Vilnius

December (Lt. ‘gruodis’) is named after harsh, dry frost (‘gruodas’). After several global-warming type of winters, it’s already the second which is exceptionally cold. It is -13 at the moment, and if it goes down even more, it seems that eyelids will freeze together after every blink. Like any stronger weather-related phenomenon, snow exposes the mismanagement of Vilnius’ streets. Sloping, narrow streets of the old town, when frozen, are a particular torture for old people. But even young ones get injured. It’s too dangerous to keep your hands in your pockets, but too cold to keep them outside. Continue reading