Category Archives: Academic

Media analysis resources

[Entries from 2008 are imported from another blog]

I really love the book:

Allan Bell. 1991. The language of news media. Oxford, UK ; Cambridge, MA : Blackwell.

I just wish I had more time to really read it, and not scan it. It’s too detailed sometimes and presents rather common-sense facts, but I see it as a good description of the news-making process, and it perfectly arranges and conceptualises my own experience of working for the media. Just look at these elegant expressions:

“lexicon of newsworthiness” of the leads
“telegraphic syntax” of the headlines
headlines and their metaphors “stamp the newspapers individuality”

Another nice article on the media:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10584600600629711

These media theories are scarily true – I recognise the same patterns in my own work, which I did before CEU.

Main concerns (fieldwork)

[Entries from 2008 are imported from another blog]

The main problems I’m having with the thesis are the following:

  • How to write critically about the people who were so helpful and wasted their precious time to help me with a totally minor paper?
  • Too few interviews, but nothing can be done about it anymore.
  • Incomplete grasp of the field. Ideally I should know the perspective of policy makers, academics, etc etc.
  • Two vectors of research: the centre of the first part is metaphor usage, whereas in the second it’s always about agency.

Leaving Brussels

[Entries from 2008 are imported from another blog]

So, my fieldwork is kind of over, I have five interviews and one possibility to interview someone online. It was more complicated than I expected, but the material, I think, is great, and the last interview was extremely critical and helped me put together my research approaches. Also, the Tibet issue proved to be not an obstacle but rather a catalyst for my research, since most of these people were asked to comment on the issue and sometimes even expressed their opinions on it without me asking. I got some encouragements from them for the research too.

Anyway, a year ago I wanted to move away from political science, and still in autumn, when my classmates were continuing with European integration studies and the like, I was happy not to have this anymore. But this part of social sciences ran to catch me back in Brussels, and, who would have thought, here I am, doing some sort of institutional/network anthropology.

I went to a big contemporary art exhibition today, and guess what, one of the exhibits was a pair of shoes attached to the wall with a word on each shoe: “Free Tibet”

Elite anthropology resource

[Entries from 2008 are imported from another blog]

I’m starting my academic blog with my MA thesis fieldwork in Brussels on knowledge-making about China.

In case you might be interested, I found this article on elite interviewing quite useful:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/419807

It’s not even Anthropology, rather Political Science, and not very new, but I found it useful.